NetCmdlets 2016
NetCmdlets 2016
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Get-DNS Configuration

The cmdlet accepts one or more of the following configuration settings. Configuration settings are similar in functionality to properties, but they are rarely used. In order to avoid "polluting" the property namespace of the cmdlet, access to these internal properties is provided through the Config method.

DNS Configuration Settings

UseDNSAPIDLL:   Whether to use the system dnsapi.dll on Windows Systems.

This setting specifies whether to use the system dnsapi.dll when using the cmdlet. If True, the cmdlet will use the Windows System dnsapi.dll. This may be desirable in some cases to allow querying against the system cache. If set to False (default) the cmdlet will use its own DNS implementation to perform queries.

The default value is False.

NOTE: This functionality is only available in Windows.

UDPPort Configuration Settings

CaptureIPPacketInfo:   Used to capture the packet information.

If this is set to true, the component will capture the IP packet information.

The default value for this setting is False.

Note: This setting is only available in Windows.

DestinationAddress:   Used to get the destination address from the packet information.

If CaptureIPPacketInfo is set to true, then this will be populated with the packet's destination address when a packet is received. This information will be accessible in the DataIn event.

Note: This setting is only available in Windows.

DontFragment:   Used to set the Don't Fragment flag of outgoing packets.

When set to True, packets sent by the cmdlet will have the Don't Fragment flag set. The default value is False.

LocalHost:   The name of the local host through which connections are initiated or accepted.

The LocalHost setting contains the name of the local host as obtained by the gethostname() system call, or if the user has assigned an IP address, the value of that address.

In multi-homed hosts (machines with more than one IP interface) setting LocalHost to the value of an interface will make the cmdlet initiate connections (or accept in the case of server cmdlets) only through that interface.

If the cmdlet is connected, the LocalHost setting shows the IP address of the interface through which the connection is made in internet dotted format (aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd). In most cases, this is the address of the local host, except for multi-homed hosts (machines with more than one IP interface).

LocalPort:   The TCP port in the local host where the cmdlet binds.

This must be set before a connection is attempted. It instructs the cmdlet to bind to a specific port (or communication endpoint) in the local machine.

Setting this to 0 (default) enables the system to choose a port at random. The chosen port will be shown by LocalPort after the connection is established.

LocalPort cannot be changed once a connection is made. Any attempt to set this when a connection is active will generate an error.

This; setting is useful when trying to connect to services that require a trusted port in the client side. An example is the remote shell (rsh) service in UNIX systems.

MaxPacketSize:   The maximum length of the packets that can be received.

This setting specifies the maximum size of the datagrams that the cmdlet will accept without truncation.

ShareLocalPort:   If set to True, allows more than one instance of the cmdlet to be active on the same local port.

This option must be set before the cmdlet is activated through the Active property or it will have no effect.

The default value for this setting is False.

UseConnection:   Determines whether to use a connected socket.

UseConnection specifies whether the cmdlet should use a connected socket or not. The connection is defined as an association in between the local address/port and the remote address/port. As such, this is not a connection in the traditional TCP sense. What it means is only that the cmdlet will send and receive data only to and from the specified destination.

The default value for this setting is False.

QOSDSCPValue:   Used to specify an arbitrary QOS/DSCP setting (optional).

UseConnection must be True to use this setting. This option allows you to specify an arbitrary DSCP value between 0 and 63. The default is 0. When set to the default value the component will not set a DSCP value.

Note: This setting uses the qWAVE API is only available on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and later.

QOSTrafficType:   Used to specify QOS/DSCP settings (optional).

UseConnection must be True to use this setting. You may specify either the text or integer values: BestEffort (0), Background (1), ExcellentEffort (2), AudioVideo (3), Voice (4), and Control (5).

Note: This setting uses the qWAVE API which is only available on Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 or above.

Note: QOSTrafficType must be set before setting Active to true.

UseIPv6:   Whether or not to use IPv6.

By default, the component expects an IPv4 address for local and remote host properties, and will create an IPv4 socket. To use IPv6 instead, set this to True.

Socket Configuration Settings

AbsoluteTimeout:   Determines whether timeouts are inactivity timeouts or absolute timeouts.

If AbsoluteTimeout is set to True, any method which does not complete within Timeout seconds will be aborted. By default, AbsoluteTimeout is False, and the timeout is an inactivity timeout.

Note: This option is not valid for UDP ports.

FirewallData:   Used to send extra data to the firewall.

When the firewall is a tunneling proxy, use this property to send custom (additional) headers to the firewall (e.g. headers for custom authentication schemes).

InBufferSize:   The size in bytes of the incoming queue of the socket.

This is the size of an internal queue in the TCP/IP stack. You can increase or decrease its size depending on the amount of data that you will be receiving. Increasing the value of the InBufferSize setting can provide significant improvements in performance in some cases.

Some TCP/IP implementations do not support variable buffer sizes. If that is the case, when the cmdlet is activated the InBufferSize reverts to its defined size. The same happens if you attempt to make it too large or too small.

OutBufferSize:   The size in bytes of the outgoing queue of the socket.

This is the size of an internal queue in the TCP/IP stack. You can increase or decrease its size depending on the amount of data that you will be sending. Increasing the value of the OutBufferSize setting can provide significant improvements in performance in some cases.

Some TCP/IP implementations do not support variable buffer sizes. If that is the case, when the cmdlet is activated the OutBufferSize reverts to its defined size. The same happens if you attempt to make it too large or too small.

 
 
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NetCmdlets 2016 - Version 16.0 [Build 6335]